RSS

Tag Archives: williston

Forget the bait, catch a prehistoric monster!

Paddlefish

North Dakota is good at extremes: extreme weather, extreme landscape and of course extreme fishing! Wintertime is often a time where our anglers focus on ice fishing, tiny rod over a stationary hole waiting to catch loads of panfish in below freezing temperatures. The exact opposite of that would be paddlefishing! Hunting a single 100+ pound fish with a rod as thick as a pool cue and twice as long in gorgeous May weather.

May 1st anglers will line the shores of the Missouri Yellowstone confluence area in search of the prehistoric-monster-hundred-pound paddlefish, sometimes called spoonbill. And forget the bait, snaggers tie huge treble hooks to heavy test line trying to get their hook into the mouth of a fish as it happens to swim by.

The season opens May 1st and a paddlefish tag is required, this can be bought at the same time and places fishing licenses are bought and are required in addition to the regular fishing license. They are $7.50 for nonresidents and $3 for residents. The season is is open until May 31st and is subject to an in-season closure. If the season closes early because the harvest quota is reached, an extended snag-and-release-only period will be allowed for up to seven days immediately following the early closure, but not to extend beyond May 31. Sunday-Tuesday are catch and release only days and Wednesday-Saturday are mandatory harvest days, all snagged paddlefish must immediately be tagged and kept.

Hooking a paddlefish is like hooking the bumper of a car, you’re in for one heck of a ride until it runs out of gas.

Advertisements
 
1 Comment

Posted by on April 30, 2012 in Fishing, Outdoor Adventure, Sports, wildlife

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Spooky times in North Dakota

Fort Abraham Lincoln has a reputation as one of the most haunted places of North Dakota.  Rumor has it that when Custer House (where General George Armstrong Custer and his wife Libby lived) was reconstructed in 1989 the men and women who long ago lived and died at Fort Lincoln were themselves resurrected. Interpreters and tourists both reported paranormal experiences from the beginning, and as more buildings were added, so too were hauntings to the chronicles of the strange and unexplained at Fort Lincoln. A woman wearing a black dress is seen looking out a second-floor window of the Custer House; footsteps are heard pacing the sergeant’s quarters in the Barracks; the voices of weeping women echo along the boardwalk; a shadowy figure stalks the Commissary at night; horses’ hooves stomp the dirt of their stalls in the Stables.

Paranormal activity has continued for years; occasionally a new phenomena is documented, like floating orbs in photographs. In 2002, Haunted Fort was created at Fort Abraham Lincoln – giving visitors the opportunity to have a spooky, hair-raising good time at a fascinating (and haunted?) historic site.

Haunted Fort will be open October 20, 21, 22, 27, 28 and 29.  Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park is a great visit at all times of year.

More Scary Situations and Fall Travel Ideas

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 20, 2011 in Attractions, Entertainment, Events

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Exploring Western North Dakota

What do you get when you take a beautifully rugged landscape dotted with oil wells and intersected by scoria roads, an old train-tunnel-turned-walking-path, forts and other interesting attractions and some unique shopping?

I introduce you to the western edge of North Dakota.  Beauty, history and fun combined!

Take for instance, Beach – just a mile from the Montana border – where you’ll find Prairie Fire Pottery offering tours and handmade, unique pottery every day.  If the shop isn’t open – just call the phone number on the door!  Now that’s North Dakota hospitality.

A bit north, west of Cartwright, North Dakota, is the Fairview Bridge – a 1,320 foot structure spanning the Yellowstone River.  It leads to the only tunnel in the state – a 1,458 foot long tunnel built mostly by hand in 1912 and 1913.  It’s very cool to walk through but you won’t find me there on Halloween!

A bit north are the fascinating and well-interpreted stops of Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site and Fort Buford State Historic Site near Williston.  Fort Union was the most important trading post on the upper Missouri from 1828-1867.  Fort Buford is where Sitting Bull surrendered in 1881.  Much more area history is found at the Missouri-Yellowstone Interpretive Confluence Center – a place to explore history, genealogy, art and more.

Just east of that western border is Theodore Roosevelt National Park – a wealth of wildlife viewing, natural beauty, horseback riding and hiking trails and undisturbed campgrounds.  Make this area part of your vacation plans!

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Flood update from North Dakota Tourism

There is an emergency in Minot, North Dakota right now, along with several communities along the Souris River – for travel information, contact the Minot Convention and Visitors BureauStatewide flood information is available along with travel information from North Dakota’s travel counselors [1-800-435-5663].

Actor Josh Duhamel offers support for his hometown

Concern and support for Minot has been flowing in faster than the Souris, including from Transformers 3 Actor Josh Duhamel who called Minot this morning from Moscow (where he is promoting the new movie).  He also told Entertainment Tonight about how people can donate to the Red Cross efforts in Minot.  How very cool and respectable that this Hollywood Star has such deep North Dakota roots.  Be sure follow Duhamel on Facebook and Twitter.  Watch his call-in with this YouTube clip and his ET interview.

I also found the words written on the Visit Minot blog yesterday to be provoking and inspirational:

Minot is facing one of the most devastating floods the city has ever seen …  The community has come together to help family, friends, neighbors, coworkers, and in some cases perfect strangers … We know there is going to be along road ahead of us … But there is no doubt we will make it through this … All it will take is a little Magic.

For travelers wondering about Minot here’s a snapshot of closures:

Additional flood news

While the Souris River makes national headlines in Minot, the Missouri River continues to create additional news throughout the country.  Here in North Dakota, the water level along the Missouri River is stable.  Our friends in Williston report that the swollen river has given Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site a historically authentic experience – as it would have appeared during the times of fur trade.  All visitor experiences are open in Williston.

Lake Sakakawea is certainly at an all-time height.  Water temperatures are rising and reports are trickling in that the walleye bite is warming up as well.  All resorts, campgrounds and boat ramps are open on the big lake.  Check road reports for closures and construction news.

In Washburn, the Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center is open, but there are no tours at historic Fort Mandan.  And across the river near Stanton, Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site is also open.

Bismarck-Mandan does have closures at campgrounds and marinas.  There are some road closures and traffic limitations.  Visitors should know that all shopping, dining and most attractions are open including Raging Rivers Waterpark, the Heritage Center, Custer House at Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park and many more.  Softball players and their families coming to the Capitol City this weekend for the McQuade’s tournament will have only a few road construction detours to worry about.  The Bismarck Marathon, which will take place September 17, will have a new route.

While there is a no-wake zone along the Missouri River to the headwaters of Lake Oahe (just south of Bismarck-Mandan), fishing continues with many access points in this giant lake.

Along the Little Missouri River – all visitor centers and scenic drives in both the North Unit and South Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park are open (and spectacular).  Campgrounds have re-opened in the park and in Medora – where the famed Medora Musical and Pitchfork Fondue are being offered nightly (through September 10) and all visitor services are open.  Bully Pulpit Golf Course has 9 holes open and playable.

And in Devils Lake, there is some road construction and road closures due to the mystifying lake – Fort Totten State Historic Site is open, Sullys Hill National Game Preserve is open upon appointment, the Spirit Lake Casino is open as well as all visitor services in Devils Lake and numerous boat ramps.  Don’t forget to visit the Lake Region Heritage Center Museum – it’s a gem!

While news in Minot, Bismarck, Medora and other cities flood-affected have created a lot of concern – we’d like to also note that adventurous, fun and memorable experiences await you throughout North Dakota.  We have thousands of events, historical sites, museums, nature areas and so much more.  A favorite of mine – the F-M RedHawks are at home in Fargo this weekend.  Our guests love North Dakota – read their stories at www.RULegendary.com – and then come back and share your own!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Legendary Phil Jackson

The best coach in the National Basketball Association officially announced his retirement last night, and it’s time for us to say “Congratulations Phil Jackson!”  That isn’t just because his 1,155 wins and career .704 winning percentage is the best in NBA history, it’s also because North Dakota is proud of this hometown hero and hopes he has a heck-of-a-fun retirement!

Jackson was raised in Williston, North Dakota, and began his legendary basketball career there – leading the high school team to two state titles.  Jackson went on to the University of North Dakota (in Grand Forks), where he helped the team to third- and fourth-place finishes in the NCAA Division II tournaments in 1965 and 1966.

In 1967, Jackson was drafted by the New York Knicks.  He played professionally for 13 years and in 1987 began a coaching career with the Chicago Bulls that included a promotion to head coach in 1989.  Jackson coached the Bulls to 6 championships in nine seasons.

In 20 years of coaching (9 with the Chicago Bulls and 11 with the Los Angeles Lakers), Jackson notched 11 championships and numerous other accolades.  He coached some of the best in professional basketball, including Michael Jordan, Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant.

In 1992, Jackson was honored with a Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Award.  His portrait hangs in the Rough Rider Hall of Fame, on the lower level of the Capitol building.

While we honor this great coach from Williston whose career took him across the nation, we recognize that dream starts wherever you play – including here in Bismarck with the NBA D-League Team, the Dakota Wizards.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fishing North Dakota

I answered the phone yesterday to this greeting, “I can’t take it anymore.”  Thinking that something may be wrong, I got concerned.  The response was, “Keith keeps texting me about all the fish he’s catching; I’ve gotta get out there.”  And thus began my husband’s afternoon on the Missouri River.  That was followed up by this morning’s journey to the Missouri River.  And in these two days of fishing I’ve gotten these photos texted to me.

 

You could say the fishing in North Dakota is already pretty good … and considering anglers haven’t gotten out on Lake Sakakawea and Devils Lake yet, it’s only going to get better.

The season doesn’t close/open for North Dakota fishing, with the exception of paddlefishing – which opens on Sunday, May 1. The season is scheduled to run through the end of May, though state wildlife officials will close it early to protect the fish population if it appears too many paddlefish will be caught. That’s happened eight times in the past 10 years.  North Dakota’s Game and Fish Department has the info on this exclusive season.

The paddlefish is one of the largest freshwater fish found in North America.  It’s often desired for its caviar, and a Williston nonprofit called North Star Caviar harvests the paddlefish eggs and sells them to raise money for community grants and paddlefish research.

A new paddlefish state record was set in 2010 when then 16-year-old Alex Mergen snagged one weighing at least 130 pounds.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on April 29, 2011 in Fishing, Just for Fun

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fur traders reenact frontier life at Fort Union

Journey to Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site this weekend, for a hands-on look at frontier life.

The Fort Union Muzzle Loaders will occupy Fort Union, Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 4 and 5, acting the role of American Fur Company employees during the winter.  These employees would have pressed furs and robes, hauled wood and water, cut ice and did a little trading with American Indian tribes.  Visitors will also be invited to try pemmican.  Pemmican was the food of survival during the time – met and dried berries pounded into a paste and covered with melted fat, then pressed into cakes.  There will also be coffee, cider and biscuits for the less adventurous.

Inside the Bourgeois House at Fort Union, see the fur trade exhibits and take a look at the fort’s book store.

Fort Union is located 25 miles southwest of Williston on Highway 1804.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on November 30, 2010 in Attractions, Events, Family Fun, History

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,